IICLE – NEW PUBLICATION RELEASE – ENVIRONMENTAL LAW FOR ILLINOIS CRE TRANSACTIONS


IICLE | 3161 W. White Oaks Dr. | Ste. 300 | Springfield, IL 62704 | United States

NEW PUBLICATION RELEASE

2014 Edition (Includes Forms)

Environmental Law in Illinois Corporate and Real Estate Transactions

This handbook is a unique resource for Illinois practitioners that balances business and real estate practice with environmental law issues. Whether you represent commercial landlords, manufacturers, real estate developers, government agencies, or private landowners, this handbook will prepare you to tackle any environmental issue.

It also provides practical guidance on

  • How to conduct an “all appropriate inquiries” investigation in a real estate transaction
  • The environmental due diligence process
  • Practice in various environmental forums in Illinois
  • Programs and redevelopment incentives to return brownfields to productive use
  • How federal bankruptcy law intersects with environmental issues in a real estate transaction

More Information

 

 

2014 Edition

$159

 

This handbook comes with editable forms, including

  • Definitions
  • Warranties of Seller/Due Diligence Examples
  • Standards for Issuance of NFR Letter
  • Sample Lease Provisions
  • Absolute Pollution Exclusion

  May Also Be Interested In:

Publication: Commercial Real Estate

 

2011 Edition (Includes Forms) & 2013 Supplement (2 Vols.)

Publication: Real Estate Litigation

 

2013 Edition (Includes Forms)

 

Program: Real Estate Short Course

 

Seminar | September 9 – 10, 2014

 

 

Value Investing vs. Momentum Investing

As the commercial real estate market begins to pick up steam, beware the urge to follow a “momentum” investment strategy rather that a “value” investment strategy.

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photography-skeleton-keys-image28661257Momentum investing relies on market increases to generate a return on investment. It is the “rising tide floats all boats” investment model. It is the investment model of which all “bubbles” are made.

As momentum investing accelerates, investment fundamentals tend to get lost. Instead of evaluating cash on cash returns using discounted cash flows that underlie “value” investing, a casino mentality takes hold – whereby investors can justify acquiring assets generating even a negative cash return, with the notion that rising prices will yield a profit. As the saying goes: “Any fool can make a profit in a rising market – and many fools do”. The challenge, of course, comes when a market hits a plateau or, worse yet, the market declines.

As a general proposition, value investing is significantly more prudent. If a project is cash flowing, and generating a positive return on investment, today and for the foreseeable future – which is a fundamental precept of a value investment strategy – the potential added return of any increase in value in the underlying asset caused by the “rising tide” effect is icing on the cake. Choose your cake with care.

There are, of course, exceptions to every rule. But, employing an “exception” is wisely done only after sober reflection of the particular circumstance to determine that in that particular case the exception is warranted. When an exception is regularly employed, it is no longer an exception – but, rather, becomes the rule itself.

As in all markets, there will be winners and there will be losers. It makes sense in the coming commercial real estate revival to position yourself and your company as a winner. You may not get another chance.

Exercise all appropriate due diligence. Use readily available and appropriate asset protection strategies. Invest with intentional regard to reliably building wealth though a well conceived value investing strategy – not a roulette table strategy that, over time, is virtually certain to fail.

If this recent economic debacle has taught us anything, it has taught that bad things can happen to good people who lose sight of the fundamentals. Good deals – even great deals – can be made if reliable commercial real estate investment fundamentals are employed.

As a wise mentor once told me: “You have a good brain – use it.”

Good luck.

R. Kymn Harp
Robbins, Salomon & Patt, Ltd.
Chicago, IL
www.rsplaw.com
JOIN MY THOUGHTBOARD: www.Harp-OnThis.com

REPORTING FROM THE FIELD. . .

Raising Capital for Real Estate Investment

At long last, the real estate investment market is beginning to show signs life. Commercial and industrial property transactions are increasingly common, and multifamily properties of all http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photo-residential-commercial-buildings-image5364405sizes are being snapped up by investors. Historically low interest rates, high occupancy rates, increasing rental rates, and rising property values are contributing factors.

Early transactions have often been cash deals, where the investor paid cash for the property rather than seek financing. This can be a great opportunity to achieve high yields for investors flush with cash, but what about everyone else?   What about potential investors who have limited cash on hand?

Unlike the easy-credit days preceding the Great Recession, real estate investment financing is Continue reading

Keys Rules For Section 1031 Exchanges

This is the second installment of a three-part series on Section 1031 like-kind exchanges. Part 1 explained WHY you should consider use of a Section 1031 like-kind exchange when selling commercial or investment real property. Part 2 covers the key rules for HOW to implement a Section 1031 like-kind exchange. Part 3 will cover special issues applicable to a Section 1031 like-kind exchange when a Tenant-In-Common [TIC] interest is being acquired.

KEY RULES FOR SECTION 1031 EXCHANGES

U.S. Tax image [iStock]The following is an outline of key rules applicable to Section 1031 exchanges. Become familiar with these rules. Unless you intend to completely cash out of real estate investing, a Section 1031 exchange may work to your benefit. If you intend to keep investing in real estate or using real estate in your trade or business, a Section 1031 exchange will maximize the capital you have available to reinvest.

Key Elements of a Section 1031 Exchange*

What is Section 1031?

Section 1031 refers to Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.

What does it do?

Section 1031 permits a taxpayer (the Exchangor) to dispose of certain real estate and personal property and replace it with like-kind property without being required to pay taxes on the transaction.

What property qualifies?

To qualify for a Section 1031 exchange, the property being disposed of (the Relinquished Property) must have been Continue reading

Asset Protection – Lessons Learned

“The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago.

        The second best time is today.”

Chinese proverb

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-image-empty-safe-image27096841For over 35 years, I have represented commercial real estate investors, developers and business owners. Most of that time has been spent helping them acquire, finance, expand, develop, manage and grow their assets and businesses. For the past 5 to 6 years, as we have struggled through the Great Recession, a huge amount of my time has been spent helping clients keep their assets.

Growing up, I was steeped in the practical view that it is not so much what you acquire that counts, but, rather, what you keep. My parents and grandparents were not in the real estate business to make others wealthy. They were playing real life Monopoly®. They played to win. It was less about money for money’s sake than it was Continue reading

IN PRAISE OF REAL ESTATE DEVELOPERS – Let’s Do Lunch!

This article is being republished as a welcoming salutation to many of my long-lost Real Estate Developer friends.  You have been missed over the past several years. Call me.  Let’s do lunch!

RSP_LogoFull_2PMSDid I happen to mention I love Real Estate Developers? Not like I love my wife or my kids, or even my dog, but Real Estate Developers are definitely among my favorite people.

Think about it.

Real Estate Developers are like Gods. [Well, miniature gods, at least.] They create much of the physical world we inhabit. The homes and condominiums we live in. The grocery store and pharmacy down the street. The resorts and casinos and golf courses we enjoy for leisure. Restaurants. Shopping centers. Office buildings. Movie theaters. Truck terminals. Medical and surgical centers. Spas. Factories. Warehouses. Auditoriums. Parking garages. Hotels.

You name it; if its man-made, attached to dirt, and we can get inside it, a Real Estate Developer was probably involved. Continue reading

10 Things to Know About Commercial Real Estate Development Agreements

I was invited recently to speak at the Illinois Institute for Continuing Legal Education Annual Real Estate Short Course to discuss what every lawyer should know RSP_LogoFull_2PMSabout commercial real estate development agreements. In preparing for the presentation, a developer client suggested it is not only attorneys who need to know about development agreements – developer clients do as well.

So, on that note, the following is my list of the top 10 things attorneys and developers should know about commercial real estate development agreements.

TOP 10 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENTS

1.     Development Agreements are not the same thing as Construction Contracts.

2.     There are no “master form” Development Agreements.

3.     Each Development Agreement is unique to the specific development to which it relates, and must accommodate the sometimes conflicting needs, demands and desires of the constituent stakeholders, including the Continue reading

Due Diligence Checklists for Commercial Real Estate Transactions

Are you planning to purchase, finance or develop any of the following types of Commercial or Industrial Real Estate?

  • http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-image-aerial-view-building-construction-image24028951• Shopping Center?
  • • Office Building?
  • • Restaurant/Banquet property?
  • • Parking Lot/Parking garage?
  • • Retail Store?
  • • Gas Station?
  • • Manufacturing facility?
  • • Distribution Center?
  • • Logistics Terminal?
  • • Medical Building?
  • • Nursing Home?
  • • Hotel/Motel?
  • • Mixed-Use?
  • • Pharmacy?
  • • Special Use facility ?
  • • Other?

A KEY element to successfully investing in commercial or industrial real estate is performing an adequate Due Diligence Investigation prior to becoming legally bound to acquire the property. An adequate Due Diligence Investigation will assure awareness of all material facts relevant to the intended use or disposition of the property after closing.

 The following checklists will help you conduct a focused and meaningful Due Diligence Investigation. Continue reading

From Tampa Bay Business Journal – Crownfunding Rules Approved by SEC

 

Tampa Bay Business Journal
Shared from the Tampa Bay Business Journal

Crowdfunding creates some very interesting opportunities for small businesses, including small real estate related businesses. Stay tuned . . .

SEC finally approves proposed crowdfunding rules

Published: October 23, 2013 by the Tampa Bay Business Journal

Crowdfunding moved closer to becoming a reality for small businesses Wednesday morning when the Securities and Exchange Commission proposed rules that will govern how shares in small companies are sold through Internet intermediaries.

View full article

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10 THINGS EVERY BUYER NEEDS TO CLOSE A COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE LOAN

Commercial Real Estate Closings

Since 1978, I have represented borrowers and lenders in commercial real estate transactions. Throughout the process of negotiating the sale contract, all parties must keep their eye on what the Buyer’s lender will reasonably require as a condition to financing the purchase. This may not be what the parties want to focus on, but if this aspect of the transaction is ignored, the deal may not close at all.

RSP_LogoFull_2PMSSellers and their agents often express the attitude that the Buyer’s financing is the Buyer’s problem, not theirs. Perhaps, but facilitating Buyer’s financing should certainly be of interest to Sellers.  How many sale transactions will close if the Buyer cannot get financing?

This is not to suggest that Sellers should intrude upon the relationship between the Buyer and its lender, or become actively involved in obtaining Buyer’s financing. It does mean, however, that the Seller should understand what information concerning the property the Buyer will need to produce to its lender to obtain financing, and that Seller should be prepared to fully cooperate with the Buyer in all reasonable respects to produce that information.

Basic Lending Criteria

Lenders actively involved in making loans secured by commercial real estate typically have the same or similar documentation requirements.  Unless these requirements can be satisfied, the loan will not be funded.  If the loan is not funded, the sale transaction will not likely close.

 For Lenders, the object, always, is to establish two basic lending criteria:

 1.         The ability of the borrower to repay the loan; and

 2.         The ability of the lender to recover the full amount of the loan, including outstanding principal, accrued and unpaid interest, and all reasonable costs of collection, in the event the borrower fails to repay the loan.

In nearly every loan of every type, these two lending criteria form the basis of the lender’s willingness to make the loan. Virtually all documentation in the loan closing process points to satisfying these two criteria.  There are other legal requirements and regulations requiring lender compliance, but these two basic lending criteria represent, for the lender, what the loan closing process seeks to establish.  They are also Continue reading